Chinese Valentine’s Day

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The Valentine’s Day is coming up this weekend and it reminds me the Valentine’s Day in China. It is also called Qi Xi Festival or Qi Qiao Festival in Chinese.

The date is July 7th in the lunar calendar and it is August 9th in 2016. July 7th means the “evening of seven” and the original meaning was from the stars in the sky – the Plough, since about 800 B.C. The original myth for the festival is about a couple in the ancient China, who can’t get together but only meet each other once a year, which is the Qi Xi Festival.

It has been a famous festival in China and some other countries in Asia and it is an especially important festival in the southern part of China. People make Chinese knottings with red color ropes and cut red papers into some specific patterns, because these decorations mean happiness and luckiness in ancient China. In some provinces from the south, girls do their nails in a beautiful and special way, because it was also lucky for girls in ancient China to meet their “Mr. Right”. They also put candles in a boat made of paper into the river, in order to pray for their coming relationship. In some other provinces, girls also make Chinese traditional cookies and beautiful dresses by themselves to show that they are not only modern independent women, but also good at the things women had to do for their families back to thousands years ago. I really want to watch the contests for girls to make cookies and design their own clothes during Qi Xi Festival. But unfortunately, the Qi Xi Festival is not a very popular festival in the area where I’m from. Qi Xi is more famous in the non-developing towns in south and in Thailand, Japan, and Korea. Here are some photos of what girls make and do on Qi Xi Festival.

    

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What Girls Make for Food

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Special Chinese Knottings for the Qi Xi Festival

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Decorations

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Lights to Pray

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